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Global Warming

 

Global warming is a slow and steady rise in Earth's surface temperature. Temperatures today are 0.74 °C (1.33 °F) higher than 150 years ago. Many scientists say that in the next 100–200 years, temperatures might be up to 6 °C (11 °F) higher than they were before the effects of global warming were discovered.

 

Some of the predicted effects of global warming:

 

(1) Global warming is projected to have a number of effects on the oceans. Ongoing effects include rising sea levels due to thermal expansion and melting of glaciers and ice sheets, and warming of the ocean surface, leading to increased temperature stratification.

 

(2) As the climate warms, it changes the nature of global rainfall, evaporation, snow, stream flow and other factors that affect water supply and quality. Specific impacts include: Warmer water temperatures affect water quality and accelerate water pollution.

 

(3) The global warming will affect human health. The observed and projected increased frequency and severity of climate related impacts will further exacerbate the effects on human health.

 

What is the greenhouse effect and how greenhouse effect is affecting global warming:

 

The greenhouse effect is a natural process that warms the Earth's surface. When the Sun's energy reaches the Earth's atmosphere, some of it is reflected back to space and the rest is absorbed and re-radiated by gases in Earth's atmosphere. The absorbed energy warms the atmosphere and the surface of the Earth. When the Earth's atmosphere becomes thick with gases and substances which trap the sun's radiation, it makes the Earth warmer. This phenomenon of greenhouse effect is called global warming.

 

What are the major greenhouse gases, mainly responsible for global warming?

 

The major greenhouse gases are water vapour, which causes about 36–70% of the greenhouse effect; carbon dioxide (CO2), which causes 9–26%; methane (CH4), which causes 4–9%; and ozone (O3), which causes 3–7%.